Download PDF by Zack R. Bowen: Musical allusions in the works of James Joyce: early poetry

By Zack R. Bowen

ISBN-10: 0873952480

ISBN-13: 9780873952484

High-quality textile replica in a close to fantastic dw. really and unusually well-preserved; tight, vivid, fresh and particularly sharp-cornered. ; 372 pages; Description: 372 p. track. 24 cm. matters: Joyce, James, 1882-1941 --Knowledge--Music. Joyce, James, 1882-1941. Ulysses.

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28-29) * Cf. Clown's Songs in Twelfth Night REMARKS: The clown sings four songs in Twelfth Night and it is not certain which songs Stephen refers to. The only one the clown sings for the duke deals with the adolescent fantasy of death and ignominious burial without a * Copyright 1944, 1963 by New Directions Publishing Corporation (Page references to the New Directions edition, 1963). " The song, which matches the duke's melancholy mood, works in the context of the continuing conversation between Stephen and Father Butt about the liberal and useful arts and the language of tradition and literature as opposed to the language of the market place.

Francis X. Newman has suggested further that Stephen's satiric criterion of the useful aspects of the songs was embodied in his question of whether or not they should be learned by heart, presumably for examination purposes. Stephen used to call him 'Bonny Dundee' nonsensically associating . . his brisk name and his «brisk manners with the sound» of the line: Come fill up my cup, come fill up my can. (p. 44) Cf. "Bonnie Dundee" REMARKS: Dundee, the Jacobite leader, was the subject of this well-known ballad which commemorates the emotional appeal of John Graham of Claverhouse (Viscount Dundee) to the Scottish Lords for their support of the returning James in his bid for the throne.

It is conceivable that Carmen's self exile from the prevailing society and the love triangle of the opera may have provided the basis for Richard's penchant for exile and love rivalry in his adult life. His father has nurtured these aspects of Richard's nature by providing him with funds to go. "(pp. 57-58) Cf. "O du mein holder Abendstern"(The Evening Star) REMARKS: When Wolfram sings this greeting to the evening star and the departing and presumably dying Elizabeth, he sings as the responsible, God-fearing lover-rival of Tannhäuser, who is a slave to the lust of Venus.

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Musical allusions in the works of James Joyce: early poetry through Ulysses by Zack R. Bowen


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